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Yeh Dosti Hum Nahin Todenge Lyrics – Kishore Kumar

Yeh Dosti Hum Nhi Todenge

Yeh dosti hum nahi todenge
Todenge dam magar tera saatha na chhodenge
Yeh dosti hum nahi todenge
Todenge dam magar tera saatha na chhodenge

Aye meri jeet teri jeet teri haar meri haar
Sun aye mere yaar
Tera gham mera gham teri jaan meri jaan
Aisa apna pyaar

Jaan pe bhi khelenge, tere liye le lenge
Jaan pe bhi khelenge, tere liye le lenge
Sab se dushmani

Yeh dosti hum nahi todenge
Todenge dam magar Tera saath na chhodenge

Logon ko aate hain do nazar hum magar
Dekho do nahi
ho judaa ya khafa ae khuda hai dua
Aisa ho nahi

Khaana peena saath hai
Marna jeena saath hai
Khaana peena saath hai
Marna jeena saath hai
Saari zindagi

Yeh dosti hum nahi todenge
Todenge dam magar tera saath na chhodenge
Yeh dosti hum nahi todenge
Todenge dam magar tera saath na chhodenge

About Kishore Kumar

In addition to playing comic roles in Indian films of the 1950s, Kishore Kumar was also known for his expressive and versatile singing voice, which he lent to many of India’s top screen actors in the course of a career spanning nearly four decades, whose original name was Abhas Kumar Ganguly. (born August 4, 1929, Khandwa, British India—died October 13, 1987, Bombay [now Mumbai]).

Kumar was born into a Bengali professional family in Madhya Pradesh, a state in west-central India. His elder brother Ashok Kumar was the star of the Bombay Talkies film studio when he was a teenager. His first acting role was in the nondescript 1946 film Shikari, though his heart was in singing. As a singer-actor, he rose to fame after the 1951 release of Andolan, which ultimately freed him from his brother Ashok’s shadow.

In his early years as an on-screen celebrity, Kumar was primarily known for his slapstick comedies, in which he demonstrated both his ability to sing and play humorous roles. He played an unemployed young man desperately seeking a job to support his family in Bimal Roy’s Naukri (1954) and Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Musafir (1957). The comedy actor Kumar reached his peak in New Delhi (1956), in which he played a North Indian Punjabi pretending to be a South Indian Tamil in order to rent a room in the city. The self-produced film Chalti ka naam gaadi (1958; “That Which Runs Is a Car”) starred three brothers—Ashok Kumar, Anoop Kumar, and Kishore Kumar—as three brothers whose lives are upended by two women who threaten their vow of bachelorhood.

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